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Tower Cranes Send Everton Stadium Build Into Overdrive

Progress on Club's new home continues to advance.

The installation of four tower cranes at Bramley-Moore Dock is set to send Everton’s new stadium build into overdrive.

Two giant tower cranes were erected in just two days and now stand 60m and 70m high in the north east and south west corners of the development in north Liverpool.

In the coming fortnight, they will be joined by two more 55m-high cranes in the north west and south east corners, all bolted into 18m-deep concrete piles set into the infilled dock.

Once operational, the tower cranes will facilitate the next stage of the build in the east and west stands.

And with the steelwork continuing to extend at the two northern edges of the stadium, the outline of the 52,888-seater stadium is beginning to take shape.

Gareth McNary, Lifting Operations Leader with Laing O’Rourke, said: “In my eyes this is the kick-start, because things will start taking shape and moving relatively quickly now.

“Next Monday we’ll install the third crane on north west corner and then we’ll go to the opposite corner.

“It’s taking shape and it will be very exciting for everyone. It’s not every day you get the chance to build a Premier League stadium from scratch!”

The cranes all stand at slightly differing heights to avoid the risk of jibs colliding when they overlap on the east and west stand builds.

Working independently and in tandem, they can cover the length of the stadium site and will be used to lift the precast concrete elements into place.

“When we build the concrete cores with crawler cranes, they are more restricted in the radius they can reach,” added McNary.

“Once the tower cranes are up, with a 60m jib on, the lifting radius capacity increases vastly and they accelerate the lifting operations.”

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Tower Cranes Send Everton Stadium Build Into Overdrive

The installation of four tower cranes at Bramley-Moore Dock is set to send Everton’s new stadium build into overdrive.

Two giant tower cranes were erected in just two days and now stand 60m and 70m high in the north east and south west corners of the development in north Liverpool.

In the coming fortnight, they will be joined by two more 55m-high cranes in the north west and south east corners, all bolted into 18m-deep concrete piles set into the infilled dock.

Once operational, the tower cranes will facilitate the next stage of the build in the east and west stands.

And with the steelwork continuing to extend at the two northern edges of the stadium, the outline of the 52,888-seater stadium is beginning to take shape.

Gareth McNary, Lifting Operations Leader with Laing O’Rourke, said: “In my eyes this is the kick-start, because things will start taking shape and moving relatively quickly now.

“Next Monday we’ll install the third crane on north west corner and then we’ll go to the opposite corner.

“It’s taking shape and it will be very exciting for everyone. It’s not every day you get the chance to build a Premier League stadium from scratch!”

The cranes all stand at slightly differing heights to avoid the risk of jibs colliding when they overlap on the east and west stand builds.

Working independently and in tandem, they can cover the length of the stadium site and will be used to lift the precast concrete elements into place.

“When we build the concrete cores with crawler cranes, they are more restricted in the radius they can reach,” added McNary.

“Once the tower cranes are up, with a 60m jib on, the lifting radius capacity increases vastly and they accelerate the lifting operations.”