Next Match:

Spurs (A) Sun 30 Nov 2014, 16:00, Barclays Premier League

What The Papers Say

by Andy Lewis @efc_andylewis

Everton v Krasnodar

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The views on this page are taken from the local and national media and do not necessarily reflect the views of Everton. 

The Echo

 

LEON OSMAN says it is a pleasure to be involved in Everton FC’s stylish run of form.

The midfielder’s first Premier League goal of the season sparked his side’s first-half fightback against Southampton on Saturday, and heralded an emphatic period of play for the Blues.

Osman, 31, admitted the slick way Everton have been playing as they climbed to second place in the table has been appreciated in the dressing room.

“We’re playing some decent football at the minute and hopefully the fans are enjoying it – we’re enjoying playing it.

“We don’t want to ge carried away. Things can change so easily in the Premier League and you saw in the second half (against Southampton) that it wasn’t as easy on the eye as in the first but we had to grind it out and we did that.

“I’m not sure what the key is to maintaining it. I’m sure the manager is trying to figure it out too but we have just got to keep believing in ourselves and stay confident.”

Everton travel to Wigan’s DW Stadium on Saturday before another international break means a pause in the fixture list, and the midfielder hopes David Moyes’ men can keep their momentum going.

He said: “We showed good character on Saturday. The lads didn’t panic or get nervous and change the way we played even though we conceded that early goal. We carried on going and were rewarded with the goals before half-time.

“Wigan isn’t too far away we usually fill all of our end and have a few pockets of our supporters in the home end too.

“I’m sure we’ll get a good following and hopefully we can carry on playing the way we have been.”

Meanwhile, summer recruit Matthew Kennedy said he has already settled in at Everton after netting his first goal for the Under-21 side.

The 17-year old joined the Blues from Kilmarnock on the final day of the summer transfer window and capped a whirlwind month with a well-taken strike and two assists in the 5-2 win over Bolton on Sunday.

He said: “This whole set-up is like a family and it seems impossible not to settle.

“I feel I have already. I’ve been here a month now and I’ve been staying with (fellow new arrival) Ben McLaughlin. We get on well together and the family we’re staying with have been brilliant.

“They’ve helped me settle in as well as all of the boys. They’ve all been great in bringing me into the group.

“As a team, I thought the lads performed brilliantly.

“The coach keeps saying we’ve got excellent talent in the squad and that we hadn’t shown it enough.

“But when we play like we did in the second half – that was unbelievable. I don’t think anyone could stop us.

“I got on the scoresheet too, luckily. It was great for me to get my first goal.”

The Echo

 

 

POLICE investigating the Hillsborough disaster smeared Everton FC fans and the city of Liverpool in a bid to heap blame upon Liverpool FC supporters.

West Midlands assistant police chief Mervyn Jones – who was leading the external inquiry into South Yorkshire police’s conduct in the aftermath of the tragedy – linked both sets of supporters to allege fan trouble was “some Liverpool characteristic”.

The outrageous claim appeared designed to push a crooked notion that the Leppings Lane crush was a result of endemic hooliganism on Merseyside.

Documents unearthed by the ECHO and disclosed to the Hillsborough independent panel detail how Mr Jones wrote to Lord Justice Taylor’s inquiry in June, 1989, to tell of trouble at the Blues’ FA Cup semi-final against Norwich at Villa Park, the same day as Hillsborough.

Mr Jones enclosed three statements from fellow officers, detailing allegations of drunk, ticketless and unco-operative Everton fans, which, he said, “reflected similar behaviour to the Liverpool supporters at Hillsborough”.

He said the three reports bore “remarkable coincidences” to now-discredited police accounts of Liverpool fans’ behaviour that day.

Mr Jones, who had been on duty at Villa Park, wrote: “I had not previously experienced dealing with supporters in such great number who had consumed so much alcohol.

“Consequently, the accounts that I have read on Liverpool supporters’ behaviour at Hillsborough show some remarkable coincidences which may indicate some Liverpool characteristic.”

The witness statements of the three officers, dated two months after Hillsborough, deride many Everton fans as ticketless, drunk and unco- operative.

One tells of how Everton fans jumped turnstiles and threatened turnstile staff to get into the ground.

The “Liverpool characteristic” of unruly behaviour was repeated in a South Yorkshire police report into Reds fans’ behaviour.

The 204-page dossier – Report, Statements and Documents Showing Behaviour of Liverpool Fans Before, During and After the Disaster’ – alleged that a “nucleus” of ticketless LFC fans caused “severe policing problems”.

In it, author Detective Inspector Alan King alludes to Everton: “The Everton supporters’ behaviour at Villa Park shows a remarkable coincidence with the Liverpool supporters at Hillsborough which may indicate some Liverpool characteristic.”

The revelations were today condemned by Blues fan John Munro, whose Southport supporters’ club took 50 fans to Villa Park for the match.

He said: “There was absolutely no trouble that day. None at all. The police have said that to cover their own backs and take the pressure off themselves. It is easier to put it on Merseyside football fans.

“I remember when news filtered through to Villa Park about what was happening at Hillsborough. I’ve never seen so many people subdued in all my life.”

Mr Jones served as Cheshire police chief constable from 1993 before retiring in 1997.

When the West Midlands inquiry into South Yorkshire police’s role at Hillsborough was announced, he vowed: “There’s going to be no whitewash.”



 

POLICE investigating the Hillsborough disaster smeared Everton FC fans and the city of Liverpool in a bid to heap blame upon Liverpool FC supporters.

West Midlands assistant police chief Mervyn Jones – who was leading the external inquiry into South Yorkshire police’s conduct in the aftermath of the tragedy – linked both sets of supporters to allege fan trouble was “some Liverpool characteristic”.

The outrageous claim appeared designed to push a crooked notion that the Leppings Lane crush was a result of endemic hooliganism on Merseyside.

Documents unearthed by the ECHO and disclosed to the Hillsborough independent panel detail how Mr Jones wrote to Lord Justice Taylor’s inquiry in June, 1989, to tell of trouble at the Blues’ FA Cup semi-final against Norwich at Villa Park, the same day as Hillsborough.

Mr Jones enclosed three statements from fellow officers, detailing allegations of drunk, ticketless and unco-operative Everton fans, which, he said, “reflected similar behaviour to the Liverpool supporters at Hillsborough”.

He said the three reports bore “remarkable coincidences” to now-discredited police accounts of Liverpool fans’ behaviour that day.

Mr Jones, who had been on duty at Villa Park, wrote: “I had not previously experienced dealing with supporters in such great number who had consumed so much alcohol.

“Consequently, the accounts that I have read on Liverpool supporters’ behaviour at Hillsborough show some remarkable coincidences which may indicate some Liverpool characteristic.”

The witness statements of the three officers, dated two months after Hillsborough, deride many Everton fans as ticketless, drunk and unco- operative.

One tells of how Everton fans jumped turnstiles and threatened turnstile staff to get into the ground.

The “Liverpool characteristic” of unruly behaviour was repeated in a South Yorkshire police report into Reds fans’ behaviour.

The 204-page dossier – Report, Statements and Documents Showing Behaviour of Liverpool Fans Before, During and After the Disaster’ – alleged that a “nucleus” of ticketless LFC fans caused “severe policing problems”.

In it, author Detective Inspector Alan King alludes to Everton: “The Everton supporters’ behaviour at Villa Park shows a remarkable coincidence with the Liverpool supporters at Hillsborough which may indicate some Liverpool characteristic.”

The revelations were today condemned by Blues fan John Munro, whose Southport supporters’ club took 50 fans to Villa Park for the match.

He said: “There was absolutely no trouble that day. None at all. The police have said that to cover their own backs and take the pressure off themselves. It is easier to put it on Merseyside football fans.

“I remember when news filtered through to Villa Park about what was happening at Hillsborough. I’ve never seen so many people subdued in all my life.”

Mr Jones served as Cheshire police chief constable from 1993 before retiring in 1997.

When the West Midlands inquiry into South Yorkshire police’s role at Hillsborough was announced, he vowed: “There’s going to be no whitewash.”

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