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What The Papers Say - 30 September

by Daniel Alston @efc_danalston

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Sunday Mirror 

David Moyes has warned the title-chasing heavyweights they might have cause to be worried about his rampant Everton team come spring.

Everton have matched their best start to a Premier League season after coming from behind to beat Southampton 3-1.

They maintained the pace of early form eight seasons ago to clinch a top-four finish and Moyes said: “We want to put ourselves in a European position and then maybe the dream spot. I don’t think United and City will be worried if we’re near the top now, but they may be if we are up there in April. It took us 15 minutes to get going today, but then for 30 minutes it was great theatre.

“You would watch Everton at the minute. There was action nearly every minute. We’ve got threats from all areas now.”

Southampton are in danger of being swamped on their return to the Premier League. Boss Nigel Adkins said: “You’ve got to score goals, but at the moment we’re shipping too many.”

Sunday Mirror

Something special, perhaps even momentous, is happening at Everton.

Not only are they matching their best start to a Premier League season, they are doing it with an image makeover.

David Moyes has built the club’s ­reputation and consistency over the past decade on organisation and pragmatism. They have always been difficult to beat yet rarely easy to love.

But now the Everton manager has added to those fundamental qualities the imagination, penetration and panache of a team that will command the respect of the nation’s finest.

Southampton are, of course, far from featuring among them and look ominously on course for an instant return to the Championship.

They will, however, vouch for the goal-scoring instincts of Nikica Jelavic, the increasing confidence of Kevin ­Mirallas, the marauding threat from Leighton Baines, the skills of Steven Pienaar and the towering influence of Marouane Fellaini.

Croatian Jelavic scored two of the three goals as Everton came from behind to effectively settle the contest by half-time.

An appreciative Moyes said: “It took us 15 minutes to get going, but then for 30 minutes it was great theatre. You would watch Everton at the minute. There was action nearly every minute. We’ve got threats from all areas now.

“We want to put ourselves in a European place and then maybe the dream spot. I don’t think United and City will be worried if we’re near the top now, but maybe they will be if we are up there in April.”

Southampton carry a ­guarantee of goals wherever they go. Alas for Nigel Adkins’ side, most of those goals are in their net.

They are determined to take on the big boys with a bold front, but the danger is they will be battered beyond hope before the new year.

Defiant Adkins said: “We’ve come away with a desire to win. We should be positive because it’s about winning.

“You’ve got to score goals, but at the moment we’re ­shipping too many goals and we’ve got to address that.”

Southampton picked up where they left off the previous week. Rickie Lambert’s corner drifted over Tim Howard and Leighton Baines was powerless to prevent ­Gaston Ramirez from heading a simple opening goal.

Everton had the opportunity to reply in kind, but John Heitinga headed straight at goalkeeper Paulo Gazzaniga from Baines’ corner.

Heitinga will have felt better after playing his part in the patient keep-ball that led to Everton’s equaliser. Mirallas eventually whipped in a cross and Leon Osman thrashed in the loose ball.

Mirallas demonstrated his ability in the middle of the pitch, running with the ball and then releasing the perfect pass for Jelavic to beat a badly positioned Gazzaniga and put Everton in front.

Gazzaniga made amends to deny Jelavic, but could not keep out the striker’s header following Seamus Coleman’s surging run and centre.

Mail on Sunday

Defiant Adkins said: “We’ve come away with a desire to win. We should be positive because it’s about winning.

“You’ve got to score goals, but at the moment we’re ­shipping too many goals and we’ve got to address that.”

Southampton picked up where they left off the previous week. Rickie Lambert’s corner drifted over Tim Howard and Leighton Baines was powerless to prevent ­Gaston Ramirez from heading a simple opening goal.

Everton had the opportunity to reply in kind, but John Heitinga headed straight at goalkeeper Paulo Gazzaniga from Baines’ corner.

Heitinga will have felt better after playing his part in the patient keep-ball that led to Everton’s equaliser. Mirallas eventually whipped in a cross and Leon Osman thrashed in the loose ball.

Mirallas demonstrated his ability in the middle of the pitch, running with the ball and then releasing the perfect pass for Jelavic to beat a badly positioned Gazzaniga and put Everton in front.

Gazzaniga made amends to deny Jelavic, but could not keep out the striker’s header following Seamus Coleman’s surging run and centre.

The feeling on Merseyside, which is becoming increasingly apparent further afield, is that Moyes has assembled the best squad of his 10-year tenure.

Their statistics this season seem to give some credence to that suggestion as Everton, the perennial slow starters, managed just two wins from their first seven league matches last year and did not win a league match until October the campaign before that.
 
After such an impressive start the players were having to deal with the prospect of handling rising expectations but they were not so adept at dealing with Southampton's set-pieces.

From Adam Lallana's corner Ramirez was given the freedom of the penalty area to nod in the simplest of headers.
 
It was the Uruguay international's first goal in English football following his club-record £12million summer transfer from Bologna and the first time Everton have conceded in the opening 45 minutes of a Premier League game this season.

Southampton were to regret Jay Rodriguez's inability to hit the target - let alone test Tim Howard - when he outpaced the Toffees defence soon after.

Everton turned the game on its head in a 14-minute period which exposed all the flaws characteristic of a newly-promoted team.
 
Kevin Mirallas swung over a right-wing cross and although Jelavic threw himself at it he succeeded only in diverting it back to Osman who smashed the loose ball into the roof of the net from close range.

The goalscorer returned the favour when his through-ball sent Jelavic running through the inside-left channel but Paulo Gazzaniga's woeful positioning made it all-too-easy for the Croatia international to fire a shot across him.

Southampton's goalkeeper redeemed himself slightly by brilliantly clawing out the striker's header destined for the top corner but was powerless to prevent him nodding in Seamus Coleman's cross to the far post

Mail on Sunday

Everton manager David Moyes admits his side's lofty position in the Barclays Premier League may not be a concern for the title contenders just yet but it would be later in the season.

A 3-1 victory over Southampton, where the Toffees recovered from Gaston Ramirez's first goal in English football with a close-range effort from Leon Osman and two strikes from Nikica Jelavic in a 14-minute period before the interval, put them within three points of leaders Chelsea.

Everton have equalled their best points haul of 13 from six Barclays Premier League matches from the 2004-05 season - when they went on to qualify for the Champions League for the first and only time.
 
Moyes is keen for people to not get carried away but admits he is holding out hope of securing 'a dream spot' in the top four.

'I don't think Everton managers can come in here and say "Let's avoid relegation" but I think that is always the first route for every club and it still is for Everton,' said the Scot, whose side are perennially poor starters.

'The next part is then "can we make a European spot" and if you are very good "can you make the dream spots, the big ones?"
 
'I'd like to be in there, in the mix, during the season but I don't think Manchester United and Manchester City will be worried to see Everton there at this time of the year.

'They might be worried if in April time we slip to the top of the league.'

Moyes was pleased with the way his side responded after going behind early on, especially after their disappointing Capital One Cup exit at Leeds.

'We played ever so well at times in the first half but it took us 15 minutes to get going as I felt there was a bit of a hangover from the result in midweek,' he added.
 
'But they deserve great credit for going about their job and how well they played.'

'It was nearly action every minute: it was great theatre for 30 minutes before half-time and we maybe could have scored more.

'I was clapping at the number of opportunities and chances and you could see how much the crowd are enjoying it so when you drop off (after half-time) it is quite noticeable.

'It is always a dangerous score when you are leading by two because you are worried if you concede one they are back in the game and I think we played like that in the second half.'

Southampton manager Nigel Adkins rued missed chances which would have turned the match in their favour.
 
'I think we started the game very well and for the first 20 to 25 minutes we have taken the game to Everton,' he said.
 
'We scored a good goal from a corner and if Jay Rodriguez had gone in and scored (when clean through) to make it 2-0 it might have been a different final reflection.

'Goals change games and with 25 minutes gone the first real passage of play when Everton put a consecutive period of passes together gave them a goal.

'The crowd got behind them, they upped their tempo and the second goal came from a counter-attack which changed the complexion of the game.

'For the 10 minutes before half-time Everton were well in the ascendancy and we weren't able to deal with it.

'Second half we came out with good composure to pass the football and if Gaston Ramirez's little chip had just gone inside the post rather than outside it could have been an interesting final period.'

 The Observer

The last time Everton collected 13 points from the opening six games of a season they went on to reach the Champions League qualifiers. The last time, 2004‑05, they were not as good as this. David Moyes's latest incarnation were again commanding and at times exhilarating as Southampton were made to suffer.

Nikica Jelavic scored twice as Everton recovered from falling behind to Gastón Ramírez's early header and maintained their encouraging start in the Premier League. Nigel Adkins, the Southampton manager, had cause to regret the failure to add to his £12m record signing's first goal in English football during a vibrant opening. In truth, his overriding emotion should have been one of relief. This was a long, educational afternoon on Merseyside for the men from the south coast.

"There were times when I was applauding myself," said Moyes, not a man who is easy to please. "It took us 15 minutes to get going, I think there was a hangover to losing at Leeds, but after that there was action every minute in the first half. It was great play and great theatre for 30 minutes and we could have scored more." Everton had to settle for three and a standing ovation instead.

There was a contest for 25 minutes and Southampton were worthy of their lead as Everton struggled defensively and in the search for a final touch to their intricate passing display. Once Moyes's team clicked, however, their performance came together beautifully. In 13 devastating minutes Southampton were routed.

Everton superiority was an illusion in the early exchanges. Adkins's adventurous team, built around the guile of Ramírez operating behind Rickie Lambert and Jay Rodriguez, were confident after their first league win of the season last weekend and were gifted the lead when the home defence and notably Tim Howard failed to intercept Adam Lallana's corner. The Uruguay international was completely unmarked as he headed home.

On the back of Tuesday's elimination from the Capital One Cup at Elland Road, the early goal added to the anxiety around Goodison and in Everton's play. Southampton should have doubled their lead when Rodriguez comfortably outpaced John Heitinga to Frazer Richardson's long ball but, with only Howard to beat, dragged his shot wide of the far post. A key moment.

Adkins reflected: "We came away from home and played to win. If Jay had scored it might have been a different story but once Everton scored from their first real passage of play they upped the tempo, the Goodison crowd got behind them and it was very challenging for us to stay in the game after that."

Everton levelled through Leon Osman after the impressive Kevin Mirallas crossed for Jelavic and the ball fell kindly for the midfielder, and parity marked the start of an onslaught. The Belgium internationals Mirallas and Marouane Fellaini combined superbly to cut through a crowded central midfield. Mirallas sent Jelavic clear down the left and he guided the ball beyond Paulo Gazzaniga into the far corner. Poor positioning from the Southampton goalkeeper made the finish simpler than it should have been.

The Croatia international scored his second of the game and third of the season with a back-post header after fine work down the right from Seamus Coleman, who seized a rare opportunity to impress at right-back.

The second half was a nonevent but for a Ramírez chip over Howard that rolled agonisingly wide. Everton coasted home and Southampton improved defensively, as they must do to avoid a struggle against relegation.

Daily Express (new)

NIKICA JELAVIC’S double ensured Everton recovered from their midweek dose of Capital punishment in style.
 
The Toffees spent the days leading up to this game in the dog house following their Capital One Cup humiliation at Leeds.

And listening to David Moyes bark out orders on the training pitch certainly had the right affect.

Having gifted Saints a sloppy goal in the opening minutes, they dominated the game and put a smile back on Moyes’ face.

Moyes said: “We played ever so well at times but it took 15 minutes to get going and there was a hangover from the result in midweek.

“The players deserved credit for going about their job and in the end we really could have scored more.’’

It looked like it could be a shaky day for Everton when Gaston Ramirez netted after just six minutes. Adam Lallana dropped a corner deep into Everton’s box and the Uruguay star, unmarked six yards out, seemed almost embarrassed to score his first goal for Saints in such an easy manner.
 
Saints spurned a glorious chance to net a second. Jay Rodriguez latched on to Frazer Richardson’s ball down the line, but feebly sent his shot wide.

Finally, though, the Toffees got a grip on the game. Kevin Mirallas made the most of the space down the right and fired a low ball into the area.

Jelavic was crowded out, but Leon Osman followed up to bang the ball past the exposed Paulo Gazzaniga.

It was not long before Gazzaniga was beaten again. Marouane Fellaini ensured Mirallas was able to continue his run from deep with a smart return pass, and he found Jelavic in space.

The Croat looked up to find keeper Gazzaniga had got his positioning all wrong and rolled the ball home.

Gazzaniga brilliantly gloved away a Jelavic header that seemed destined for the top corner. But Jelavic beat Gazzaniga seconds later to give Everton a two-goal advantage.

Seamus Coleman raided down the right and found his striker free at the far post with time to nod past the keeper’s despairing attempt to claw the ball to safety.

Everton had their prey just where they wanted them and memories of the 7-1 thrashing of 1996 were flooding back.

Fellaini again tested Gazzaniga with a shot from distance that the keeper touched away athletically.

Then Mirallas was denied a well-deserved goal by the huge frame of the visiting number one.

But with 22 minutes left, Saints suddenly came alive. Ramirez was put through on goal by Rickie Lambert and lifted the ball over Tim Howard.

It bounced once and rolled just wide. Panic over, what there was of it, and Everton were never going to lose this game.

Even a powerful Lambert header, saved by Howard, failed to stop them deservedly jumping into second place for a while. The question is how long can they stay in the top four?

For Saints, the question is can they stay in the Premier League.

Boss Nigel Adkins said: “We took the game to them but at the moment we are shipping too many goals and that’s something we will address.’’

The Independent on Sunday

Everton, the notoriously sluggish starters, are absolutely flying, with the most points they have ever accumulated at this stage of a Premier League season, matching the total of 2004. That year, of course, culminated in Champions' League qualification. And they have managed this supreme points haul with an exuberant front four that will cause much better teams than Southampton a great deal of hassle.
 

Fighting back from a goal down, David Moyes' side exuded complete control of the game for over an hour, but were gifted the points by shambolic defensive organisation. "I was probably due a good start!" Moyes laughed afterwards. "We're able to play in different ways now. Watching Everton you would say we look more likely to score. There was a piece of action every minute and it was great theatre. We maybe could have scored more," before labelling the top four as the club's aim this campaign.

On this evidence that looks eminently achievable but before all the Everton adoration Southampton, clearly buoyant following their 4-1 win against Aston Villa last Saturday, started with the confidence to suppress their hosts by pressing in good areas and quickly launching counter attacks.

It often started from their centre-halves. Maya Yoshida won possession far too easily before sauntering forward into the Everton final third. From the next phase of play, they forced a corner which Adam Lallana whipped in and as Tim Howard flapped. The unmarked Gaston Ramirez nodded into an empty net.

Tails up, and Toffees down, it should have been 2-0 moments later. James Ward-Prowse's hopeful forward pass caught out John Heitinga, who was too slow to catch Jay Rodriquez, but the striker sliced wide.

The tide turned in the 24th minute, however, seconds before Everton equalised. Phil Neville collected a ball midway inside his own half, bereft of ideas or options. Goodison Park howled, which acted to give their team impetus. Saints' pressing was eventually their undoing. After a string of passes, Kevin Mirallas' cross found Leon Osman who thrashed it in. The sense of relief, soon turned into urgency.

Goalkeeper Paulo Gazzaniga strayed too far beyond his near post, gallingly widening Nikica Jelavic's aim, to gift Everton the lead. They were now up against it.

When Seamus Coleman glided past the napping Lallana and then Nathaniel Clyne, it became clear just what Nigel Adkins is up against this season, particularly away from St Mary's. Exciting on the ball, brilliant going forward, but his side is not defensively-inclined. Coleman picked out Jelavic to score his second.

Southampton defending is something that will be talked about for hours over the course of the next eight months. They have now conceded 12 goals on their travels and it could have been more here. They lack steel in midfield – the cultured Steven Davis was the holder – and were playing their third different back four in as many games. Marounae Fellaini hit the bar and Jelavic went close to a hat-trick in a fashion that was all too easy. "One Nigel Adkins" rang out from the away end, but their manager must accept part of the blame.

"We've come away from home with a desire to win. We took the game to Everton but that spell before half-time we were far too open," he said. "You should always be positive and look to win games. I believe we play good passing football, but we are shipping far too many goals. It's something we're addressing."

Sunday Telegraph

There has been a frustrated and long-standing assumption among Evertonians that if their team could just begin a season in the form with which they reliably finish one, a regular place in European competition would be attainable; possibly more.

Perhaps it is the year to prove the theory correct. Performances like this overwhelming of Southampton are not isolated.

Results over the past month mean Everton have equalled their best start to a campaign, set in 2004-05 when Champions League qualification was secured.

Everton are a different side to those that have been before under David Moyes, though. Points are no longer simply ground out. They out-think opponents, press high, and excite spectators. Their achievements are marked by the fact that even Southampton outspent them by a considerable amount in the summer.

Yet the visitors could not deal with such zeal here. Everton’s confidence means they can move up the gears when they need to and enjoy conservative possession the rest of the time; knowing there is always Nikica Jelavic and Marouane Fellaini to rescue them.

Moyes described his team’s creativity as “great theatre,” and he was right. The margin of victory could have been greater. “You would watch Everton now,” Moyes insisted. “You can see how much the crowd is behind it as well.” Despite falling behind early on to a Gaston Ramirez header, as soon as the hosts found an equaliser, the future was certain.

Everton initially lacked concentration and there should have been further punishment for their relaxed start. From a simple pass into the right channel, Jay Rodriguez beat John Heitinga to the ball. Honing in on goal, the former Burnley striker could only sliced wide. The miss was crucial.

When standards are set, expectation levels increase and the impatience inside Goodison Park was tangible. An equaliser came just at the right time.

Phil Neville started the move, finding Kevin Mirallas tight on the touchline. The Belgian, aided by Seamus Coleman’s overlapping run, found space to cross towards Jelavic, who threw himself at the ball. It looked like being a horrid miss until Leon Osman, running in behind him, cleaned up the mess by firing into the top corner.

Southampton are a Premier League team going forward. At the other end, though, they have problems. Manager Nigel Adkins recognised this and switched personnel around. Yet they remain brittle, especially when opponents stray from natural stations.

“I believe we play good football, but we ship far too many goals,” Adkins said. “It’s something we’re addressing.”

For Everton’s second, Mirallas warped into the centre. With no challenge, he fed Jelavic and with Paulo Gazzaniga’s positioning in Southampton’s goal leaving a gap too great, as well as swish of a left boot, it was in.

Suddenly, Everton’s control was absolute. Jelavic could have had four in the first half alone. One header was clawed away by Gazzaniga. A minute later, he couldn’t stop another one from the same player when following a dart and cross by Coleman, the Croatian connected too well.

Southampton were all over the place, their defenders falling over one another like drunken sailors. Fellaini hit the bar, Mirallas should have scored, Steven Pienaar had another chance.

Improvements were made after the break but Everton were comfortable by then and the second half drifted by.

Daily Star on Sunday

NIKICA JELAVIC’S double ensured Everton recovered in style from their midweek dose of Capital punishment.

The Toffees spent the days leading up to this game in the dog house after their Capital One Cup humiliation at Leeds.

 But having gifted Saints a sloppy goal in the opening minutes, they dominated the game.

 Not that it looked the case when Gaston Ramirez nodded in at a corner. For a time, Blues boss David Moyes probably thought it was going to be another bleak outing when Ramirez netted after six minutes.

 Adam Lallana dropped a corner deep into Everton’s box and the Uruguay star could not believe his luck.

 Left unmarked six yards out, he seemed almost embarrassed to score his first Saints goal in such an easy manner.

 Everton came back hard but had only a weak John Heitinga header to show for their efforts before Saints spurned a chance to net a second.

 Frazer Richardson’s hopeful ball down the line became a problem for Moyes’ men when Jay Rodriguez latched on to it. But he snatched at his shot, sending it wide.

 Finally though, the Toffees got a grip on the game. Kevin Mirallas made the most of the space down the right and fired a low ball into the area.

 Jelavic was crowded out but Leon Osman followed up to bang the ball past the exposed Paulo Gazzaniga.

 It was not long before Gazzaniga was beaten again. Marouane Fellaini ensured Mirallas was able to continue his run from deep with a smart return pass and he found Jelavic in space.

 The Croat looked up to see Gazzaniga had got his positioning all wrong and rolled the ball inside the far post.

 The Argentinian keeper partially redeemed himself by brilliantly gloving away a Jelavic header that seemed destined for the top corner.

 But the Croat got to his feet and seconds later gave Everton a two-goal advantage. Seamus Coleman raided down the right and found his striker free at the far post with time to nod past the keeper’s despairing attempt to claw the ball to safety.

 Fellaini passed up the chance to add a fourth before the break by directing his header straight at the keeper as the visitors begged for a breather.

 And astonishingly he was allowed a free jump again on the stroke of half-time, rattling the bar with his effort. Everton had their prey just where they wanted them and memories of the 7-1 thrashing of 1996 were flooding back.

 Fellaini again tested Gazzaniga with a shot from distance. Then Mirallas was denied a well-deserved goal by the huge frame of the visiting number one.

 But with 22 minutes left, Saints suddenly came alive. Ramirez was put through on goal by Rickie Lambert and lifted the ball over Tim Howard.

 It bounced once and rolled just wide. Panic over – what there was of it – and Everton were never going to lose this game. Even a powerful Lambert header, saved by Howard, failed to stop them deservedly taking all three points from the south coast side.

 Now the question is how long can they stay in the top four?

 Moyes said: “We played ever so well at times. It took 15 minutes to get going and there was a hangover from the result in midweek.

“We didn’t need the half-time. We could have kept playing. It is always a dangerous result to be leading by two goals. That maybe caused us to be more cautious in the second half.”

Saints boss Nigel Adkins said: “We took the game to them and scored a good goal. If Jay Rodriguez had made it two-nil, it might have given the game a different complexion. We are shipping too many goals and that is something we are addressing.”

The Echo

EVERTON FC recovered from a shaky start to beat Southampton 3-1 with a thrilling attacking display at Goodison Park.
 
Croatian striker Nikica Jelavic did the damage with two expertly taken first-half goals after Leon Osman had restored parity for David Moyes’ men.
 
It was just the tonic after the disappointment of being knocked out of the Capital One Cup at Elland Road on Tuesday, and although other results prevented the Blues briefly sampling top spot in the Premier League they remain hotly on the heels of table-topping Chelsea.
 
At times in the later stages of the first half Everton's football was a delight to watch, although they failed to turn the screw on Nigel Adkin’s men in the second half after Jelavic had been replaced by Victor Anichebe and the impressive Kevin Mirallas had exited for Bryan Oviedo.
 
Initially the Blues made life difficult for themselves when slack marking from Leighton Baines allowed Gaston Ramirez pulled away from the England full-back too easily, and head home Adam Lallana’s corner after six minutes.
 
At the other end John Heitinga tried to hit back immediately, and the set-back was certainly not about to damage the confidence of a team which has been unbeaten at home so far this season.
 
While Everton were having plenty of the ball, their full backs were struggling to find the right delivery into the box. But Mirallas showed them how to do it in style, when he fired a dangerous pass into Jelavic in the area. The Croatian stumbled as he tried to steady himself, but Osman was on hand rap the loose ball emphatically into the top of the net.
 
There was no miss-step from the striker next time however, when he timed his run perfectly and seized on Mirallas’ smart through ball before rolling his shot coolly past Gazzaniga to give Everton the lead.
 
Then Seamus Coleman excelled with a wonderful run and cross which Jelavic headed ruthlessly beyond Paulo Gazzaniga. The Croatian has taken his time getting going so far, but this was the Jelavic of last term; confident and deadly in front of goal.
 
Suddenly it could have been a cricket score. But while the hosts still dominated in the later stages they were unable to find a way through, and had to be content with three.
 
Moyes made a raft of changes, giving Victor Anichebe a run out introducing Bryan Oviedo and Sylvain Distin.
 
But even though there was to be no emphatic seal on the display, Everton remain in the top flight’s upper echelon –edging ever closer to being able to declare this a good start and begin dreaming about a top four finish.
 
It would help, of course, if all defences were as accommodating as Southampton’s, but a topsy-turvy week had ended on a high.
 
Moyes will want more of the same at Wigan's DW Stadium next week before the international break.

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