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Thursday 18 September K.O. 20:05

The Men Who Sealed The Crown

The Men Who Sealed The Crown

This weekend evertonfc.com is celebrating 50 years since Everton's glorious 1962/63 title success.

Led by the disciplinarian Harry Catterick, the Blues finished the campaign six points clear of nearest rivals Tottenham Hotspur to return the Football League trophy to Goodison Park for the first time in 24 years.

But who were the men that made it all possible? We profile them – with the help of their teammates - below.

1962-63 team photoFrom back row (left to right): Tony Kay, Mick Meagan, Alex Scott, Brian Labone, Derek Temple, Gordon West, Roy Parnell, Harry Catterick, Jimmy Gabriel, Alex Parker. John Moores, Dennis Stevens, Albert Dunlop, Roy Vernon, Alex Young

TONY KAY
Harry Catterick went back to former club Sheffield Wednesday to sign Anthony Herbert Kay midway through the 1962/63 season. A talented, combative left-half, his Blues career would be cut short at 50 appearances after he and two teammates were alleged to have bet on a match they'd played in during their time at Hillsborough. Kay was convicted of conspiracy to defraud in 1964, sentenced to four months in prison and given a life ban from football. The ban was rescinded seven years later but he never played a professional game again. “Tony Kay was a very, very good player and it was sad what happened to him,” says Blues teammate Mick Meagan. “Knowing Tony, I still don't believe that he was at fault. He was a character all right but there was no way he would throw a match - he was so competitive. You could say there was a little bit of Duncan Edwards in him. He wasn't a tall man or built powerfully but he was very, very hard and a very good footballer.”
1962/63 Apps: 21
1962/63 Goals: 1

MICK MEAGAN
Born in Dublin, Meagan was snapped up by Everton after appearing against a Liverpool district team in the city in 1952. A defender, he went on to amass 177 appearances for the Club before departing Goodison Park in 1964. He would later have spells at Huddersfield Town, Halifax, Drogheda United, Bray Wanderers and Shamrock Rovers before becoming the first manager of the Republic of Ireland national team to be given total control over selecting players.
1962/63 Apps: 36
1962/63 Goals: 0

ALEX SCOTT
Outside-right Scott only joined Everton from Glasgow Rangers in January 1963 but went on to play a key role in the second half of the campaign as the Blues edged ever closer to title glory. A Scotland international who would return to his homeland to play for Hibernian and Falkirk, he enjoyed four years at Goodison Park, racking up 178 outings and 26 goals. “I was lucky to score quite a few goals over the years and a lot of them came from Alex," recalls 1966 FA Cup hero Derek Temple. "He was quite a big fella for a winger but he was quick and always taking the full-back on. We often roomed together and he liked his food. If we had a good away win, Harry [Catterick] would say you can have anything you want off the menu. Scotty would go through the card and then top it off with a cigar and a brandy.”
1962/63 Apps: 17
1962/63 Goals: 4

BRIAN LABONE

Perhaps the most famous of the faces in the picture, centre-back Labone would also help the Club to FA Cup glory in 1966 and a further league triumph in 1970. “He was a big lad but I never saw him intentionally kick anybody," says Temple. "You used to get the likes of Bobby Collins who would kick his grandmother if it would win him a point. Brian, though, was more cultured - he would rely on his football, not kicking people up in the air." A one-club man described by Catterick as 'the last of the Corinthians', he was also booked just twice in his 13-year Blues career. "At that time there were a lot of stopper centre-halves, and while he could do all that, he could pass a ball and distribute it as well,” adds broadcaster John Keith. “He was a wonderful, commanding centre-half."
1962/63 Apps: 45
1962/63 Goals: 0

DEREK TEMPLE
Rocked by a serious ankle injury early on in the season, Temple would miss out on a winner’s medal in 1962/63 after making only five first-team appearances. A versatile attacker with a keen eye for goal, he would make up for it by netting the winner in the famous FA Cup final defeat of Sheffield Wednesday three years later. A Toffees youth-team product, he smashed 83 goals in 275 appearances for the Club before ending his career with spells at Preston North End and Wigan Athletic.
1962/63 Apps: 5
1962/63 Goals: 1

GORDON WEST
An agile, dependable shot stopper, West joined Everton from Blackpool ahead of the 1962/63 campaign, the £27,000 fee a British record for a goalkeeper. He immediately displaced Albert Dunlop and became the Club's first-choice custodian for much of the next decade. A key figure in the FA Cup success of 1966, he also kept goal for Catterick's second title campaign in 1970. But while tough and outspoken on the outside, looks could be deceiving: “Westie was a very nervous fella," explains Temple. "He'd get really nervous before the game and he'd be sick very often before we went out. But once he got out there he was so important to us.”
1962/63 Apps: 43
1962/63 Clean Sheets: 17

ROY PARNELL
A right-back, Parnell would make only three career appearances for the Toffees and none in the 1962/63 campaign. Born in Birkenhead, he went on to turn out over 100 times for Tranmere Rovers before ending his career with a short spell at Bury.
1962/63 Apps: 0
1962/63 Goals: 0

HARRY CATTERICK
The man responsible for one of the most successful decades in the Club’s history, Catterick was an enigmatic authoritarian who watched from afar but always made his feelings known. Players talk of him watching training through the gaps of his manager’s office curtains and only ever donning a tracksuit when television cameras were near. Friends they may not have been, but his aptitude for getting the best out of his players was unquestionable. Read a full profile of Catterick and his achievements here.

JIMMY GABRIEL
A stalwart of the 1962/63 side, Gabriel had joined the Blues from Dundee at the turn of the decade. A wing-half with a relentless engine, the twice-capped Scotland international would run out in the blue of Everton 303 times before setting sail for Southampton in 1967. He later appeared for Bournemouth, Swindon Town and Brentford before heading Stateside for a spell with Seattle Sounders, a team he managed for a short time in the 1970s. Gabriel later joined the backroom staff at Everton and had two brief spells as caretaker manager in the 1990s. Now residing in America once again, he was Seattle's assistant boss for eight years between 1997 and 2005. “Jimmy was a great wing-half. He was a big, strong lad and he could play anywhere really," says Temple. "He was what I would call a hard man. He got kicked quite a lot, but he never wore shin pads. He'd just mark his opponent’s card for next time and make sure he got them back.”
1962/63 Apps: 45
1962/63 Goals: 6

ALEX PARKER
An elegant left-sided full-back, Parker moved to Everton from first club Falkirk in 1958 and would appear 220 times during a seven-year stay.  The 1962/63 success would ultimately prove the highlight of a career which also took in spells with Southport, Ballymena United and Drumcondra.  “Alex was an absolute gent," recalls fellow title-winner Tony Kay. "He could deliver a long ball beautifully and could slide tackle like no player I had ever seen before or have ever seen since.”
1962/63 Apps: 38
1962/63 Goals: 2

JOHN MOORES
The founder of the Littlewoods business empire and one of the masterminds behind the Football Pools, Moores gave up his chairmanship of the latter in 1960 to take up a role as an Everton director. He became the Club's chairman in April 1961 and would spend nine years in the role across two spells. He was made a Freeman of the city of Liverpool in 1970 and became Sir John Moores a decade later, three years after stepping down from the Goodison board. Renowned for his charitable instincts and generosity, Moores famously displayed his cold-blooded side in 1961, sacking manager Johnny Carey in the back of a London taxi before replacing him with Harry Catterick. “It was seen as very ruthless at the time because Johnny Carey was a lovely, pipe-smoking gentleman but obviously Harry, having been brought in from Sheffield Wednesday, built a team that was the best in England at the time,” says John Keith. “That decision set the path really for what later became this wonderful rivalry between Everton and Liverpool disputing the major honours.”

DENNIS STEVENS
One of only two players to play every game in 1962/63, Stevens arrived at Goodison Park ahead of the title-winning campaign having already racked up nearly 300 league appearances for first club Bolton Wanderers. Seen by many as Catterick's unsung hero, the inside forward was a cousin of the late Manchester United and England star Duncan Edwards and ended his career with run outs for Oldham Athletic and Tranmere Rovers.  “Dennis Stevens was bought not just as an inside forward but more like a workhorse, a bit like me," says Tony Kay. "He was part of the engine room in midfield to compliment all the skilful players we had. You needed someone who could go away from home, who could go and put a shift in, get the ball and give it to the flair players. It was a job Dennis did extremely well." Stevens made 143 appearances in three years on Merseyside, scoring 23 goals.
1962/63 Apps: 47
1962/63 Goals: 9

ALBERT DUNLOP
A mainstay of the Everton side since breaking through six years earlier, Dunlop was the man to lose out when record-breaking Gordon West arrived to take his place between the sticks in March 1962. Despite that, the Liverpool-born glovesman played a key role in the following season’s title success, deputising for the injured West for the crucial final four games of the campaign. They proved to be his final appearances for the Club however; he joined Wrexham just a few weeks later and would go on to have a one-season spell as a player-manager at Rhyl.
1962/63 Apps: 4
1962/63 Clean Sheets: 2

ROY VERNON
One of the stars of the 1962/63 season, Vernon’s final-day hat-trick against Fulham saw him leapfrog strike partner Alex Young to end the campaign as Everton’s leading scorer. A pacy, skilful finisher, the 1960 arrival from Blackburn Rovers was equally adept with either foot and near infallible from the penalty spot.  A heavy smoker who would often light up in the tunnel after a game, he was also one of the side’s more intriguing characters. “He had a very dry sense of humour,” reflects Meagan.  “We were away on some little trip and ready to go to the airport and we couldn't find Roy. They looked into his room and they couldn't find him. They couldn't see him for the smoke. It was like a fog in there!” Spells at Stoke City and Halifax Town would follow but it was his time at Everton for which he will be most fondly remembered, 111 goals coming in just 201 appearances. “For me Roy Vernon doesn't get mentioned enough in the pantheon of Everton's great players,” says Keith. “He was a phenomenal talent.”
1962/63 Apps: 46
1962/63 Goals: 27

ALEX YOUNG
A fans' favourite and a hero to an entire generation of Evertonians, Young was arguably the greatest player the Club had seen since Dixie Dean. Skilful, intelligent, determined and deadly, the ‘Golden Vision’ was the perfect foil for Roy Vernon and key to the 1962/63 success.  A November 1960 arrival from Hearts, he also possessed an aerial astuteness that belied his diminutive stature and notched many of his 87 Everton goals with his head. “It's well known Alex Young and Harry Catterick didn't get on all that well because Harry inherited him and Alex was the darling of the fans,” says Keith. “But I guess if you asked those in the street of a certain age who is the greatest Everton player you've seen, a lot would say Alex Young. He had wonderfully deft skills but he could also out-head people several inches taller than him with this great spring. I think as much as any player he proved that heading is as much about timing as it is about height.” Young’s Goodison Park career would ultimately span eight years, bringing 270 appearances. Short stints at Glentoran and Stockport County would follow before he returned to Edinburgh to run a family upholstery business.
1962/63 Apps: 47
1962/63 Goals: 22

NOT IN THE PICTURE:

BILLY BINGHAM

Bingham arrived at Everton in 1961 after spells at Glentoran, Sunderland and Luton Town. A gutsy outside-right, he would prove a valuable squad player in 1962/63 before completing a move to Port Vale soon after. He famously returned to Goodison Park as manager in 1973 having enjoyed success in the hotseat at Southport, Plymouth Argyle and Linfield and as the national team boss of both Northern Ireland and Greece. He led the Toffees to the League Cup final in 1977, though his most important contribution was arguably the signing of striker Bob Latchford three years earlier.
1962/63 Apps: 28
1962/63 Goals: 6

RAY VEALL
A 1961 signing from Skegness Town, winger Veall made each of his 11 career appearances for the Blues in the 1962/63 season. Despite that, he would remain on the Club's books until a move to Preston North End in 1965. He later played for Huddersfield Town and Los Angeles Wolves before wandering on to South Africa's Maritzburg. "Ray was a very, very neat winger and he was unlucky not to play more than he did," says Meagan. "I remember we played Blackpool early on in the season and Jimmy Armfield was playing right-back. Ray gave him an awful time. He was very tricky and very at ease. He had footwork and he could beat a player." Veall now resides in New Zealand, home of his final club, Gisborne City. 
1962/63 Apps: 11
1962/63 Goals: 1

BRIAN HARRIS
Bebington-born Harris joined Everton from Port Sunlight in 1954 for a fee of just £10. It proved money well spent as he would go on to amass 358 appearances in a 12-year spell at the Club. Renowned for his laid-back, fun-loving nature, he helped Everton to FA Cup glory in 1966 before stints at Cardiff City and Newport Town, a club he would also manage. “Brian Harris was the joker of the pack and he was best in pre-season," remembers Meagan. "You might have an old bottle of lemonade or something that he'd asked you to bring in and you'd say, 'what do you want with that?'. There would always be something, some prank he had in mind.”
1962/63 Apps: 27
1962/63 Goals: 2

JOHNNY MORRISSEY
A fierce, uncompromising outside-left who would pull on Everton's royal blue jersey over 300 times, Morrissey actually began his career on the other side of Stanley Park with a five-year stint at Anfield. A £10,000 fee was enough to prise the diminutive operator away in 1962 and over the next decade he netted 50 goals, helping the Blues to two title wins and FA Cup glory in 1966. A move to Oldham Athletic followed but he hung up his boots in 1973 after just one season at Boundary Park.
1962/63 Apps: 33
1962/63 Goals: 8

GEORGE SHARPLES
Another of the Club's nearly-men, wing-half Sharples made just two of 11 Everton first-team appearances in 1962/63 and missed out on a winner's medal. Born in Ellesmere Port, he spent five years on the books at Goodison Park and also had spells with Blackburn Rovers and Southport.
1962/63 Apps: 2
1962/63 Goals: 0

FRANK WIGNALL
Though his best days would come later at Nottingham Forest, Everton youth team product Wignall left Goodison Park with an impressive record of 22 goals in just 38 appearances. Unfortunately for the striker, he had fallen out of favour by 1962/63 and after failing to earn a title medal he departed for the City Ground that summer. He also turned out for Derby County, Mansfield Town, King's Lynn and Burton Albion before retiring in 1974. An England international, the Bolton-born Wignall managed a 100 per cent record for his country, scoring two goals in two games.
1962/63 Apps: 1
1962/63 Goals: 1

GEORGE HESLOP
Centre-half Heslop completed a move from Newcastle to Everton on the eve of the 1962/63 campaign but would play just once as the Blues strode to title glory. He made a further 10 appearances before joining Manchester City in 1965, eventually becoming a regular at Maine Road. He later spent a short time at Bury before calling it quits in 1973.
1962/63 Apps: 1
1962/63 Goals: 0

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